Month: March 2017

Helmet Safety

Wearing a helmet can not only save your head, but it can save your life!

 

Spring is upon us, which means great cycling weather. We all know that our city has a great trail system, dedicated to getting families out together. We want to remind you of the importance of bicycle safety (as well as motorcycle safety!).

In 2015, 818 cyclists and 4,693 motorcyclists were killed in traffic related accidents. Annually, over 26,000 of bicycle related injuries treated in Emergency Departments to children and adolescents were related to traumatic brain injuries (TBI’s).  These numbers continue to climb, as more and more people do not practice helmet safety.

With the help of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)  and the National Highway Safety Traffic Administration (NHSTA), we compiled some tips to keep cyclists safe:

Cyclist Safety:

Follow the rules of the road – obey traffic laws:

  • Wear a Properly Fitted Bicycle Helmet
  • Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit
  • Check Your Equipment – check tire inflation, gears, chains etc.
  • Ride on the right side of the road-with the traffic flow, not against it
  • Obey traffic signs and signals just as if you were driving a car
  • Use correct hand signalshandsignals
  • Stop at all signs and red lights; and
  • Stop and look both ways before entering a street
  • If riding at dawn, at dusk, or at night, wear reflective clothing & make sure that the bike has a front headlight and a rear red reflector or flashing red light

Motorcyclist Safety:

Follow the rules of the road:

  • Wear a Helmet
  • Wear Safety Gear – not only is it important to protect your head, but protect feet and hands too
  • Leave enough space for stopping
  • Make sure you are properly licensed
  • Share the road
  •  Do not ride impaired

If you have any questions, tips, or just want to chat – reach out! We’ll be here! 

Resources/References:
https://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/toolstemplates/entertainmented/tips/headinjuries.html
http://www.bhsi.org/stats.htm 
http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/t/motorcycles/fatalityfacts/motorcycles
https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/bike/KidsandBikeSafetyWeb/index.htm
https://www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/motorcycles
http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/4740/what-hand-signals-are-there-for-communicating-with-others-when-cycling-in-a-grou

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Auto-Ped Accident – PR 17-07

 

North Richland Hills Police Department

4301 City Point Dr.

North Richland Hills, TX 76180

Carissa Katekaru                                                 PR 17-07

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release

On Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 1:12 pm, officers were dispatched to the east bound managed toll lanes of 820 at Rufe Snow Drive reference an auto-pedestrian accident. Upon arrival, officers located a deceased subject who had been struck by a four door sedan.

For a short period of time, both east bound managed toll lanes, and general lanes of Loop 820 were closed to secure the scene. During the course of the investigation, the managed toll lanes of east bound Loop 820 were closed until approximately 3:50 pm from Highway 35 to Precinct Line Rd.

Witnesses reported seeing a female climb over the side of the Rufe Snow Dr bridge and hang for a short period of time, before falling in to oncoming east bound traffic. At this point in the investigation, suicide is probable. Drug or alcohol impairment was not reported to be a factor with the driver of the sedan, and no charges are expected to be filed.

The victim is a 58 year old white female from North Richland Hills.

 

17362520_1913168932250455_2215228765676596921_n

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

#MHM – PTSD

PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is a newer term to describe, though perhaps less well, a condition induced by exposure to extreme psychological or physical trauma.

In World War I, we described soldiers as having “shell shock.” In World War II, it came to be known as “battle fatigue.” During the Korean War, it was “operational exhaustion” and finally came to be PTSD. Does anyone else notice the sterilization and softening of the language used to describe it?

We are talking about the military, and that is probably what most of us think of because of the conflicts we are currently involved in overseas. However, many other things can trigger PTSD.

Rape, sexual trauma, violent incidents, car crashes, domestic abuse, disasters, and so on. All of these things can also trigger PTSD.  Moreover, perhaps even more surprisingly, we do not even have to see these things directly. PTSD can occur from having experienced it, been exposed to it, or even having been told about it.

Let’s stick with the combat analogy for a moment. Humans are not designed to hurt each other, although we seem to be exceedingly good at it. If you do not believe that, let’s go through a relatively famous thought experiment known as “The Trolley Problem.”

Imagine yourself standing on a set of railroad tracks. A fast train is coming down the tracks toward a group of people. You notice a switch to send the train onto a second set of tracks, but that will kill a single person standing on them.  There is no time for any of course of action. Do you pull the switch?

For many, the quick and easy answer is yes. The loss of one person is preferable to the train killing a group of individuals. Tragic, yes, but logically speaking (for all you Star Trek fans), “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one.”

So let’s change up this scenario a touch. The same setup but this time the only way to stop the train is to push the man onto the tracks.

Does this change things? Logically, no. One person dying is still preferable to many dying. And, technically, you are still responsible for the death of the man.

However, does it make a difference in your mind between pulling a switch and having pushed this man to his death? Do you feel differently about whether you could or would do it?

So let’s come back to the experience of trauma. As we attempt to reconcile the traumatic event, some struggle with being able to cope to the point that it interferes with day to day life. Guilt, depression, emotional pain, and soon become overwhelming and lead to symptoms such as:

Re-experiencing symptoms:

  • Flashbacks
  • Nightmares
  • Intrusive thoughts

 

Avoidance symptoms:

  • Avoiding places, events, or things associated with the event.
  • Avoiding thoughts and feelings related to the event, including self-medicating to do so.

Reaction symptoms:

  • Easily triggered startle reflex.
  • Feeling tense, anxious, or on edge.
  • Difficulty sleeping.
  • Angry outbursts.

Mood / Thinking symptoms:

  • Memory troubles.
  • Persistent negativity about oneself or life.
  • Distorted feelings of guilt or blame.
  • Loss of interest in things once enjoyed.

So what can be done about PTSD? Well, typically a combination of medications and talk therapies (such as cognitive behavioral therapy) have been found to be the most effective. There is even a treatment that uses eye movement and trauma recollection to reduce the negative emotional impact.

Overall, there is help available for you or loved ones that are having problems dealing with emotional trauma. If you do not know where to start, follow some links below. There are also many local resources that can help.

You have heard it before, and you are about to hear it again. We are here to help. If you or someone you know needs assistance dealing with PTSD, please call me at 817-427-7092. If this is an emergency, CALL 911.

 

Resources / References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolley_problem

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder

https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/index.asp

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml

http://www.silouan.com/

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Child Safety Seat Info

We’ve seen a lot of discussion on child safety seat laws and we wanted to share some clarification regarding what the law states, as well as some suggestions regarding the use of child safety seats. The ultimate goal is safety for kids in the car! 

 
Texas Transportation Code 545.412(a) reads: A person commits an offense if the person operates a passenger vehicle, transports a child who is younger than eight years of age, unless the child is taller than four feet, nine inches, and does not keep the child secured during the operation of the vehicle in a child passenger safety seat system according to the instructions of the manufacturer of the safety seat system.
 
Therefore if your child is over the age of 8, or over 4’9″ inches, they are NOT required by law, to be in a child safety seat.
 

However, there are some suggestions that have come out from SaferCar.gov that have made some recommendations to keep kiddos safe. 

  • Select a car seat based on your child’s age and size, choose a seat that fits in your vehicle, and use it every time.
  • Always refer to your specific car seat manufacturer’s instructions (check height and weight limits) and read the vehicle owner’s manual on how to install the car seat using the seat belt or lower anchors and a tether, if available.
  • To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements.
  • Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12.

Rear-Facing Car Seat

Birth – 12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats:

  • Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing.
  • Convertible and All-in-one car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

Forward-Facing Car Seat

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

Booster Seat

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

Seat Belt

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

seats

(Information provided by: Safer Car )

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD