Auto-Ped Accident – PR 17-07

 

North Richland Hills Police Department

4301 City Point Dr.

North Richland Hills, TX 76180

Carissa Katekaru                                                 PR 17-07

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release

On Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 1:12 pm, officers were dispatched to the east bound managed toll lanes of 820 at Rufe Snow Drive reference an auto-pedestrian accident. Upon arrival, officers located a deceased subject who had been struck by a four door sedan.

For a short period of time, both east bound managed toll lanes, and general lanes of Loop 820 were closed to secure the scene. During the course of the investigation, the managed toll lanes of east bound Loop 820 were closed until approximately 3:50 pm from Highway 35 to Precinct Line Rd.

Witnesses reported seeing a female climb over the side of the Rufe Snow Dr bridge and hang for a short period of time, before falling in to oncoming east bound traffic. At this point in the investigation, suicide is probable. Drug or alcohol impairment was not reported to be a factor with the driver of the sedan, and no charges are expected to be filed.

The victim is a 58 year old white female from North Richland Hills.

 

17362520_1913168932250455_2215228765676596921_n

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

#MHM – PTSD

PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is a newer term to describe, though perhaps less well, a condition induced by exposure to extreme psychological or physical trauma.

In World War I, we described soldiers as having “shell shock.” In World War II, it came to be known as “battle fatigue.” During the Korean War, it was “operational exhaustion” and finally came to be PTSD. Does anyone else notice the sterilization and softening of the language used to describe it?

We are talking about the military, and that is probably what most of us think of because of the conflicts we are currently involved in overseas. However, many other things can trigger PTSD.

Rape, sexual trauma, violent incidents, car crashes, domestic abuse, disasters, and so on. All of these things can also trigger PTSD.  Moreover, perhaps even more surprisingly, we do not even have to see these things directly. PTSD can occur from having experienced it, been exposed to it, or even having been told about it.

Let’s stick with the combat analogy for a moment. Humans are not designed to hurt each other, although we seem to be exceedingly good at it. If you do not believe that, let’s go through a relatively famous thought experiment known as “The Trolley Problem.”

Imagine yourself standing on a set of railroad tracks. A fast train is coming down the tracks toward a group of people. You notice a switch to send the train onto a second set of tracks, but that will kill a single person standing on them.  There is no time for any of course of action. Do you pull the switch?

For many, the quick and easy answer is yes. The loss of one person is preferable to the train killing a group of individuals. Tragic, yes, but logically speaking (for all you Star Trek fans), “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one.”

So let’s change up this scenario a touch. The same setup but this time the only way to stop the train is to push the man onto the tracks.

Does this change things? Logically, no. One person dying is still preferable to many dying. And, technically, you are still responsible for the death of the man.

However, does it make a difference in your mind between pulling a switch and having pushed this man to his death? Do you feel differently about whether you could or would do it?

So let’s come back to the experience of trauma. As we attempt to reconcile the traumatic event, some struggle with being able to cope to the point that it interferes with day to day life. Guilt, depression, emotional pain, and soon become overwhelming and lead to symptoms such as:

Re-experiencing symptoms:

  • Flashbacks
  • Nightmares
  • Intrusive thoughts

 

Avoidance symptoms:

  • Avoiding places, events, or things associated with the event.
  • Avoiding thoughts and feelings related to the event, including self-medicating to do so.

Reaction symptoms:

  • Easily triggered startle reflex.
  • Feeling tense, anxious, or on edge.
  • Difficulty sleeping.
  • Angry outbursts.

Mood / Thinking symptoms:

  • Memory troubles.
  • Persistent negativity about oneself or life.
  • Distorted feelings of guilt or blame.
  • Loss of interest in things once enjoyed.

So what can be done about PTSD? Well, typically a combination of medications and talk therapies (such as cognitive behavioral therapy) have been found to be the most effective. There is even a treatment that uses eye movement and trauma recollection to reduce the negative emotional impact.

Overall, there is help available for you or loved ones that are having problems dealing with emotional trauma. If you do not know where to start, follow some links below. There are also many local resources that can help.

You have heard it before, and you are about to hear it again. We are here to help. If you or someone you know needs assistance dealing with PTSD, please call me at 817-427-7092. If this is an emergency, CALL 911.

 

Resources / References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolley_problem

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder

https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/index.asp

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml

http://www.silouan.com/

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Child Safety Seat Info

We’ve seen a lot of discussion on child safety seat laws and we wanted to share some clarification regarding what the law states, as well as some suggestions regarding the use of child safety seats. The ultimate goal is safety for kids in the car! 

 
Texas Transportation Code 545.412(a) reads: A person commits an offense if the person operates a passenger vehicle, transports a child who is younger than eight years of age, unless the child is taller than four feet, nine inches, and does not keep the child secured during the operation of the vehicle in a child passenger safety seat system according to the instructions of the manufacturer of the safety seat system.
 
Therefore if your child is over the age of 8, or over 4’9″ inches, they are NOT required by law, to be in a child safety seat.
 

However, there are some suggestions that have come out from SaferCar.gov that have made some recommendations to keep kiddos safe. 

  • Select a car seat based on your child’s age and size, choose a seat that fits in your vehicle, and use it every time.
  • Always refer to your specific car seat manufacturer’s instructions (check height and weight limits) and read the vehicle owner’s manual on how to install the car seat using the seat belt or lower anchors and a tether, if available.
  • To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer’s height and weight requirements.
  • Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12.

Rear-Facing Car Seat

Birth – 12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats:

  • Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing.
  • Convertible and All-in-one car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

Forward-Facing Car Seat

1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

Booster Seat

4 – 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

Seat Belt

8 – 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

seats

(Information provided by: Safer Car )

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

PR – 1706 – Officer Discharged Weapon

Carissa Katekaru                                                                                    PR 17-06

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release

On February 18, 2017 at 6:49 AM, a North Richland Hills officer initiated a traffic stop in the 6300 block of Davis Boulevard. After the vehicle stopped, the officer approached from the passenger side of the vehicle to speak with the driver. It was reported that the driver without warning, made a sudden lunge towards the officer, while reaching behind the passenger seat for a weapon. In fear for their life, the officer discharged one round from their duty weapon. The round however, did not injure the driver. The driver began complying with officer commands. Additional units arrived on scene, and the driver of the vehicle was placed in to custody. Officers observed a machete located behind the passenger seat.

The officer has been placed on administrative leave, as per policy, while an internal investigation is conducted. The driver of the vehicle was transported to the North Richland Hills jail, charges pending.ois_davis-blvd

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Press Release PR 17-05 – Family Violence

Carissa Katekaru                                                     PR 17-05

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

 

NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release

On February 17, 2017 at approximately 5:00 AM, officers were dispatched to the 8300 block of Davis Blvd reference a possible domestic disturbance. Officers arrived on scene and were able to secure the area. During the initial investigation, it was relayed that there may be additional occupants inside a home and that a suspect may be armed in the house.

It was discovered that two adult females reportedly sustained injuries from an assault by the male subject and left the residence to receive medical attention for their injuries. As the investigation continued, it was determined the male subject was still inside the residence with a five year old juvenile female.

At 9:04 AM officers were able to remove the juvenile female from the residence and secured her safety. Officers continued negotiations and at 11:10 AM the suspect was taken in to custody without incident.

The two adult females were treated and released from area hospitals with non-life threatening injuries. The juvenile was uninjured and later reunited with family members. The suspect has been identified as Robert Winsett, 49 year old white male. Winsett is charged with one count Aggravated Assault With a Deadly Weapon and one count Assault Family Member With Bodily Injury. He is currently being held in the North Richland Hills jail, awaiting arraignment.

**Update 1615 – Investigations has confirmed that the male subject and one of the female subjects were domestic partners.**

pr1705jpeg

carissapr1705

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

#MHM – Bipolar Disorder

When we see someone switch moods suddenly, we often hear someone say, “Wow, they are so bi-polar.”

The reality is, people with bipolar disorder do not have sudden and unexpected mood swings. That is more typical of borderline personality disorder which we talked about a couple of weeks ago.

People with bipolar disorder instead have longer cycles of mood changes between mania and depression which may cycle anywhere from a few times a year to a few times a month with most cycles lasting at least a week.

During the depressed phase, the person shows all the classic signs of a depression disorder such as feeling hopeless or helpless and having little to no motivation to enjoy things they normally would have.

During the manic phase, the person may show hyperactivity, increased impulsivity, increased risky behaviors, and go days without sleep. Some can even become psychotic during this time and have delusions or hallucinations.

Bipolar disorder also carries an increased risk of suicide with nearly 50% of those with the diagnosis having attempted at some point. The risk of suicide goes up dramatically when bipolar disorder goes untreated.

So what can be done about bipolar disorder? Well, medications such as mood stabilizers and psychotherapy techniques such as cognitive behavioral therapy have shown great success. The key is getting treatment. Treatment can also be difficult as 40% of people with bipolar disorder also have a lack of insight, called anosognosia, which we’ve talked about before as well. This lack of insight makes treatment routines difficult to stay on.

Again, treatment is key and is helpful. Some resources include:

The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide

New Hope for People with Bipolar Disorder

And, as I frequently mention, a great book for helping your loved one with a lack of insight help themselves:

I Am Not Sick; I Don’t Need Help!

 

Officer C. Morgan #622

Mental Health Peace Officer

North Richland Hills Police Department

(817) 427-7092

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Media Release – Shooting – PR 17-04

Carissa Katekaru

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release                      PR 17-04

 

On February 11, 2017 at approximately 6:28 PM, North Richland Hills Police received a report of a shooting in the 6600 block of Onyx Drive North.

Officers arrived on scene and located a 52 year old white male and 22 year old white female, both with apparent gunshot wounds.

The investigation indicates the shooting resulted from an accidental discharge of the firearm. The male subject was handling the weapon when it discharged, striking both the male and female.

Both victims were transported by ground ambulance to an area hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

 

onyx-dr-n-shooting_1704

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

Attempted Abduction Press Release PR 17-03

Carissa Katekaru

Media Relations Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Phone: (817) 427-7076

E-Mail: ckatekaru@nrhtx.com

            NEWS RELEASE                For Immediate Release            PR 17-03

The North Richland Hills Police are currently investigating a report of an attempted abduction that occurred in the area of Little Ranch Rd and Hightower Dr. The incident occurred February 9, 2017 at approximately 7:30 AM.

Police were able to determine that the victim (Male 13 yoa) was riding his bicycle to school, when he was approached by a Grey Nissan Titan.  The police were told that the driver of the truck pulled near the child and asked him if he needed a ride. The child answered “no” and the driver proceeded to get out of the vehicle. The child pulled his cell phone from his backpack and attempted to take pictures of the subject. The subject quickly returned to his vehicle and left west on Hightower Dr towards Rufe Snow.

The male driver is described as: White male, red hair and red goatee, approximately 30-40 years of age, around 6’0” tall with a stocky build and 3 visible round marks on his left cheek. Subject was reported as wearing a black sweatshirt with grey hood and sleeves, with a deer logo on the front.

The vehicle is described as: Grey Nissan Titan, 4-door, with black rims, step bar and a roll bar with six round lights.

The police are currently investigating the incident and are asking the community for their assistance in identifying all persons and possible witnesses to this incident. Please contact the North Richland Hills Police Department with any information on this incident by calling 817-427-7000.

 

attempted-abduction_1703

pr1703

*Last updated 02/09/2017 2:24 PM*

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD

 

UNIDOS Health Fair Press Release

UNIDOS Health Fair Press Release – PR 17-02

The UNIDOS team of the North Richland Hills Police Department will host a free Health Fair.  The community wide event will take place on Friday, February 25, 2017 from 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM at G.W Thomas Coliseum, 6108 Broadway Avenue Haltom City, Texas.

UNIDOS is a statewide program geared towards improving the quality of life for our Hispanic Community. This is accomplished by partnering with resources in our community to provide assistance in areas of relevance to our residents whose first language is Spanish.

The Health Fair will bring more than 40 health vendors to the market to provide services and educational materials on important health issues that affect the Hispanic community.  Services include Free Blood Pressure and Health Screenings for the entire family, information on breast and cervical cancer, Medicare/Medicaid, diabetes, dental screenings, skin care, free giveaways and more!

 

The Health Fair is free and open to the public.  For more information regarding the Health Fair, please feel free to reach out to Officer Kristina Gonzalez of the North Richland Hills Police Department at 817-427-7211 or kgonzalez@nrhtx.com.

 

unidos-health-and-wellness-fair-press-release_pr7102

Beat Management Program

Did you know the City of North Richland Hills is divided in to eight districts, also known as “beats?” Do you know what beat you live in?

For the purposes of response to calls for service, the City of North Richland Hills is divided in to eight separate geographical areas, known as districts or beats. In the Beat Management Program, patrol officers get to select (based on seniority), their own beat and work in it every day. By utilizing this program, our officers can better serve the community and form a partnership with our citizens. By managing their beats on a daily basis, officers can get to know the people that reside and work in their assigned areas, and truly understand any associated problems within their individual beat. We encourage officers to interact with staff and students in schools, attend homeowners and neighborhood watch meetings and truly “get to know” their piece of the community.

If you have any questions or to see who your assigned officer is, follow the link to our website to learn more: Beat Officers

 

beatmap

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & SnapChat! 

www.facebook.com/nrhpd     |     @NRHPD